Tag Archives: whidbey island

DOES IT MAKE SENSE TO DIY?

Should you DIY plumbing vents to the exterior of your home?  I recommend leaving this up to a qualified plumbing contractor, as venting is important and getting it wrong can lead to unpleasant sensory experiences and/or improper drainage function. 

Slow draining bathroom sink?

White Bathroom Sink and Faucet in Open Position with Clean WaterWe ask a lot of our bathroom sink drains. We pour toothpaste, soap, shaving cream, makeup and stray hair into them and expect them to work. Unfortunately, sometimes they don’t. A serious clog usually requires a chemical drain cleaner or a plumber’s snake. For a slow-moving drain, you might first try a plunger to dislodge the clog. It’s easy to use; be sure to use it carefully and avoid splashes. Before you begin, put a few inches of water in the sink to provide a good seal around the plunger. Next, stuff a wet rag into the overflow opening of the sink and seal it well. This air block greatly increases the effectiveness of the plunger. Then plunge away! You may have to refill the basin with water a few times to free a very stubborn clog.


 

Orcas Island Home Inspections, San Juan Island Home Inspections, Anacortes Home Inspections, Skagit County Home Inspections, Mount Vernon Home Inspections, Lopez Island Home Inspections, Shaw Island Home Inspections, Oak Harbor Home Inspections, Whidbey Island Home Inspections, Coupeville Home Inspections, Burlington Home Inspections, Bellingham Home Inspections, Whatcom County Home Inspections, Friday Harbor Home Inspections

DOES YOUR ROOF LOOK A LITTLE LIKE AN ALLIGATOR?

Roofing systems take a beating. After all, they are typically the home’s first line of defense against the elements.

Like all of your home’s elements, roofs will eventually show their age through deterioration. During a recent inspection on Whidbey Island, I came across built-up roof coverings that were cracking—a phenomenon in the industry known as “alligatoring.” As you might guess, this means the roof was starting to resemble reptile skin.

In my report, I recommended further evaluation by a qualified contractor to make repairs as deemed necessary. I also recommended that the clients budget for re-seal coating of the roof coverings.If you have questions or comments about roofing or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

SATURDAY REVIEW: ‘I WOULD RECOMMEND HIM TO ANYONE ESPECIALLY FIRST TIME BUYERS’

A couple of Saturdays per month, I like to share recent customer reviews with you. I hope that these client testimonies—which come primarily from YelpFacebook, and Google Reviews—help you to feel more confident in my services while also saying “thanks” to clients who provide me with feedback.

This week, we hear from client Raven McGrew.

My customers (you) allow me a chance to do a job I love in a place I’ve called home my whole life. Without you, All Islands Inspections wouldn’t exist. Thank you!

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

NOT A BRIGHT IDEA: FURNACE FLUE PIPE NEXT TO ELECTRICAL SERVICE ENTRANCE CONDUCTOR

Sometimes, I come across head-scratching scenarios—most typically as a curious handyman repair.

On a recent journey to Whidbey Island, my scratching was at a fever pitch when I noticed a furnace flue pipe near the overhead electrical service entrance conductors and adjacent exterior siding. To say this was a definite safety issue in my report was an understatement. 

Sometimes, you have to love DIYers!

If you have questions or comments about heating issues or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

ASBESTOS WHO? WHERE?

Did you know that ceiling tiles installed prior to 1980 may have asbestos in them?  These tiles for ceiling structural purposes reached their height in popularity from 1950-1980.  If these tiles are “friable” (i.e. become disturbed or airborne), they can create an environment that is unsafe for breathing.  If your ceiling tiles are cracked, it is recommended that you get them tested for asbestos and, if present, paint or otherwise seal them as soon as possible.  

Older homes semi-commonly have asbestos ceiling tiles installed which can potentially be a health risk.  Asbestos is a natural yet dangerous mineral that, if disturbed and inhaled over long periods of time, can cause serious and/or deadly illnesses.  

This material for building purposes, including floors, ceilings and walls is now regulated by the OSHA and EPA.  If you have concerns about your ceiling (or other) tiles please check out this link for further information: How do I know if I have asbestos in my home (in floor tile, ceiling tile, shingles, siding, etc.)? | Asbestos | US EPA

STANDALONE SATURDAYS: WINTER IS COMING

On Saturdays throughout the year, I hope to give you a peek of what I see as a home inspector traveling around San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit counties through photos and videos I’ve taken along the way.

I’m sure if you know or live in Northwest Washington, you probably feel the same about how special it is here. That’s why I invite you to share your Northwest Washington imagery! Simply take your picture or video showing why you appreciate the region, and tag it with #AllIslandsLife on Twitter or Facebook.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

INFOGRAPHIC: IS THE MOLD IN YOUR HOME MAKING YOU SICK?

While mold in homes rarely causes health issues, this scenario is not unheard of. If your home does have mold, it is important to address the problem in a timely and thorough manner to help you realize the best outcomes. 

If you have questions or comments about mold or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

DOING YOUR ELECTRICAL WORK? BE CAREFUL!

Surprisingly, electrical issues are common discoveries at home inspections, with the most common being improperly wired switches, outlets, and handyman/unprofessional wiring practices. Purchasing an outlet tester (costs less than $10) is a simple, quick way to determine if your home’s outlets are correctly wired. You’ll probably be surprised to find a few in your home! Unless you’re entirely confident and competent, I recommend hiring a licensed, bonded, and insured electrician to perform any and all electrical work. 

If you DIY and your work doesn’t appear professional (think PERFECT), it will likely be called out by a home inspector when your home is sold. Competent electricians are fastidious and “fussy” with their work (it’s their signature after all), and there’s nothing better than a “fussy” electrician I like to say! 

Be sure to check with the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries, as most electrical work requires a permit and final inspection. Permits are easily obtainable and inexpensive. Furthermore, having a third-party review of electrical work is just another layer of safety and insulation against potential future electrical issues. Plus, it’s the law! Finally, for the DIY homeowners out there, a great book is “For Pros by Pros: Wiring a House by Rex Cauldwell. I’ve relied on this book for years of building and remodeling. It’s excellent!

If you have questions or comments about electrical work, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).