Tag Archives: tim hance

NAIL POPS: HOME CONSTRUCTION ISSUE OR NEW MUSICAL GENRE?

Nail pops” may be unsightly, but they are common and are very rarely of any structural concern. I recently came across a home in Freeland with several nail pops protruding from a sheetrock ceiling. 

Understandably, my client wanted to know if there were any underlying issues (such as elevated moisture levels or structural deficiencies) related to these bulging eyesores. Luckily, after probing with a moisture meter, everything appeared to be in order. 

Nail pops come often appear when building components shrink after a home is built. In fact, many contractors will have a provision within the first year of a home’s construction to repair nail pops. 

For this client, I recommended they contact a qualified sheetrock contractor to make the simple repairs. Bye, bye bulges! 

If you have questions or comments about sheetrock repairs, tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

PRESSURE WASHING YOUR ROOF: JUST A REALLY BAD IDEA

Roof coverings need love. For roof coverings, love means maintenance, such as clearing roof planes of debris or treating roofs on a semi-annual basis to prevent moss growth.

Love does not mean pressure washing a roof, however. Don’t believe me? Roofing experts will tell you the same thing.

Pressure washing can cut the life expectancy of a roof dramatically, and lead to mechanical damage—such as granular loss and exposed fiberglass underlayment at roof shingles. Exposed shingles with granular loss are vulnerable to reduced life expectancy. I discovered this very scenario during a recent inspection in Coupeville.

Do you have questions or comments about roofing? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

STANDALONE SATURDAYS: SEASIDE PICNIC

On Saturdays throughout the year, I hope to give you a peek of what I see as a home inspector traveling around San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit counties through photos and videos I’ve taken along the way.

I’m sure if you know or live in Northwest Washington, you probably feel the same about how special it is here. That’s why I invite you to share your Northwest Washington imagery! Simply take your picture or video showing why you appreciate the region, and tag it with #AllIslandsLife on Twitteror Facebook.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

INFOGRAPHIC: HOW TO HIRE HOUSE PAINTER

Everyone so often, your house needs a makeover. Last month, we learned that a typical home needs a new exterior paint job about every decade on average. If you own your house for a while, that’s potentially a lot of painting.

If you are going to hire a house painter, you may want to ponder a few things in advance that will help save you money, time and general potential annoyances/pitfalls. We hope the tips below help!

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

ELEPHANT TRUNK IN THE ATTIC?  HMMMM…IT’S NOT THAT HARD TO EXTEND FAN DUCTING TO THE EXTERIOR; PLUS YOU’LL AVOID LIKELY MOLD!

If a bathroom vent fan funnels into your attic, moist air from your hot, damp bathroom can eventually (and likely) form mold and mildew on attic rafters and sheathing —and even your attic insulation.  A recent home inspection in Anacortes revealed this very issue.

Good news: There are a few different options for routing the venting to the outside of your home. A one-minute video by Today’s Homeowner with Danny Lipford does an excellent job of explaining why this is so important, and what your corrective options are.

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

WHEN IN ROME(X): HANDYMAN WIRING PRACTICES NEED TO BE ADDRESSED

During a recent inspection in Friday Harbor, I came across handyman electrical wiring practices serving garage ceiling light fixtures. In this case, homeowners had unconventionally routed Romex electrical wiring and open wire splicing.

I recommended that my clients consult with a qualified electrician to address the issue.

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

SETTLEMENT MAY MAKE YOU A WORLD TRAVELER (BECAUSE YOU TRIP SO MUCH!)

Settlement issues at outlying walkways do not always equate to structural concerns for homes. In reality, most of the time they don’t. 

However, what settlement issues do often create are tripping hazards. I noticed an example of this during a recent inspection in Ferndale, where I found apparent settlement at an entryway concrete stoop.

I notified the homeowner that this issue could easily lead to an unwary passerby having an unfortunate incident. However, I also assured them that it didn’t appear to be of structural concern to the home itself. 

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

STANDALONE SATURDAYS: BARREN BOAT

On Saturdays throughout the year, I hope to give you a peek of what I see as a home inspector traveling around San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit counties through photos and videos I’ve taken along the way.

I’m sure if you know or live in Northwest Washington, you probably feel the same about how special it is here. That’s why I invite you to share your Northwest Washington imagery!  Simply take your picture or video showing why you appreciate the region, and tag it with #AllIslandsLife on Twitteror Facebook.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

BAR SINKS SHOULDN’T DOUBLE AS IRRIGATION SYSTEMS

During a recent home inspection on Orcas Island, I came across a bar sink drain line not connected to the home’s septic system. Furthermore, the sink’s line discharged directly onto the front lawn.

That can’t be good for the landscaping.

I recommended that my clients seek further evaluation and repair by a qualified plumbing contractor to address the issue.

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).