Tag Archives: oak harbor

LOSE THE LINT: DIRECT YOUR DRYER VENT DUCTING TO THE NEAREST EXIT

During a recent trip to Oak Harbor, I came across an issue I see relatively often: dryer vent ducting discharging into a lint catchment system in the interior of the home. In this case, the ducting deposited lint and moist air straight into the garage.

There are many reasons not to do this (including so your home doesn’t smell like a laundromat). Moisture buildup (which could lead to issues such as mold growth and deterioration) and an increased risk of fire from lint accumulation probably top the list.

In other words, it’s not a good idea.

Making sure you have configured your dryer system correctly is more important than you think, and there is a definite list of “do’s and don’ts” to consider. 

By the way: Did you know the first hand-cranked clothes dryerwas manufactured in 1800? I thought you might find that interesting. I did, at least.

Do you have questions or comments about dryer vent ducting, separating whites and colors or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

IN RAINY NW WASHINGTON, CHIMNEY FLASHING DETAILS SOMETIMES NEED TLC

The following is not exactly a news flash: Rust is a common issue here in the Pacific Northwest. I know, shocking, right? Living in a coastal environment has a way of helping rust to blossom (although, as you undoubtedly know, some areas in our little corner of the world get far less rain than others).

The highest-exposure sections of a home typically lead the charge when it comes to rust, and this includes chimney flashing and counter-flashing details. Taking care of these features is very importantbecause the flashing is what seals the space between your roof and your chimney. Rust and corrosion at these areas may allow water to enter the home and be pretty darn expensive to repair or replace.

Recently, during a home inspection in Oak Harbor, I noticed this issue. I recommended that the client use an exterior-rated metal paint to extend serviceable life of the chimney flashing details that were beginning to rust and corrode. These types of preventative measures can potentially save a good bit of coin later.

Do you have questions or comments about flashing details or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

IN RAINY NW WASHINGTON, CHIMNEY FLASHING DETAILS SOMETIMES NEED TLC

https://youtu.be/H4aNiQW7_ec

The following is not exactly a news flash: Rust is a common issue here in the Pacific Northwest. I know, shocking, right? Living in a coastal environment has a way of helping rust to blossom (although, as you undoubtedly know, some areas in our little corner of the world get far less rain than others).

The highest-exposure sections of a home typically lead the charge when it comes to rust, and this includes chimney flashing and counter-flashing details. Taking care of these features is very importantbecause the flashing is what seals the space between your roof and your chimney. Rust and corrosion at these areas may allow water to enter the home and be pretty darn expensive to repair or replace.

Recently, during a home inspection in Oak Harbor, I noticed this issue. I recommended that the client use an exterior-rated metal paint to extend serviceable life of the chimney flashing details that were beginning to rust and corrode. These types of preventative measures can potentially save a good bit of coin later.

Do you have questions or comments about flashing details or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

It’s hammer time!

Does your sink ever sing to you? I recently came across such a sink at a home in Oak Harbor. The song? A little ditty called “water hammer.” 

Water hammer is the result of waterline pressure causing water pipe movement when flow is stopped or started. The “hammer” noise—which is actually a shock wave within the pipes that can lead to pipe collapse–may happen for a host of different reasons, such as insecure pipes.

If you ever notice your sink bursting out into song, consider having it further evaluated by a qualified plumbing contractor to learn more about your options—or perhaps signing it up for “America’s Got Talent.” Thanks for watching!

Questions or comments about water hammer or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and let us know at @AIHomeInspect

If you can play “peek-a-boo” through your fire separation barrier, you’ve got work to do

Fire separation barrier walls can help slow the spread of fire—if properly constructed and maintained. In today’s post, Tim Hance of All Islands Home Inspections identifies issues he recently discovered at a residential building in Oak Harbor in which a fire separation wall separating two units had fairly significant open seams in the attic. These seams should be taped and mudded. **Bonus points for readers today: What’s the difference between fire separation barrier and a firewall? Learn more here! Thanks for watching…

VIDEO: Discovering Deteriorated OSB Eave Sheathing Behind Gutters!

Tim Hance with All Islands Home Inspections recently discovered deterioration and fungal growth at OSB roof sheathing immediately behind gutters at a recent Oak Harbor, WA home inspection. It is important to keep gutters clear and free of debris to help prevent spillage that can lead to sheathing deterioration. Also, although not per se required, I always recommend installing a metal drip-edge flashing detail at all eaves (e.g., behind gutters) that is run underneath the roof coverings and over the fascia trim to further prevent water damage in the event that gutters overflow or water is introduced.

Textured “popcorn” ceilings and asbestos

Textured “popcorn” ceilings, like that pictured here, could contain asbestos, especially in homes constructed prior to 1978.  Because some sheetrock and painting contractors kept stores of this material into the early 1980s, it’s possible that textured “popcorn” ceilings in the 1980s could contain asbestos as well.  Provided the material is in good condition and not delaminating from the ceiling, this isn’t a health concern because it’s not considered “friable,” e.g., you can’t breathe it.  But if you intend to remodel (or scrape) “popcorn” ceilings, or it they’re in poor condition, testing is advised.  Asbestos can only be confirmed by laboratory testing.  This was discovered at a recent home inspection in Oak Harbor on Whidbey Island.

Serious Grime in Jacuzzi Tub!

Recently testing a Jacuzzi tub in the MBA at a recent Oak Harbor Home Inspection, a substantial amount of debris and grime came our of the jets. Can you imagine moving into your new home, filling up the tub after a long day’s work, and being surrounded with historic grime? Yuck! Luckily, there’s a solution and it’s quite simple to clean. Here’s a great link discussing how to properly clean Jacuzzi jetted tubs in homes!

https://www.wikihow.com/Clean-a-Jetted-Tub

VIDEO: Discovering ROT at Deck/Siding Interface

At a recent Oak Harbor home inspection, I discovered deterioration, rot and water damage at the interface between the deck and exterior siding. This interface really should be flashed with a metal flashing detail to prevent water intrusion which can lead to WDO (wood destroying insect) activity and water damage. When deterioration is presenting at this interface, there’s always the possibility of underlying structural damage not visible without invasive inspection. A qualified contractor should further evaluate, invasively, to determine the extent of deterioration and make necessary repairs.

VIDEO: Oak Harbor Home Inspection Discovers ROT at Deck/Siding Interface

At a recent Oak Harbor home inspection, I discovered deterioration, rot and water damage at the interface between the deck and exterior siding. This interface really should be flashed with a metal flashing detail to prevent water intrusion which can lead to WDO (wood destroying insect) activity and water damage. When deterioration is presenting at this interface, there’s always the possibility of underlying structural damage not visible without invasive inspection. A qualified contractor should further evaluate, invasively, to determine the extent of deterioration and make necessary repairs.