Tag Archives: mount vernon

DETERIORATION at Window and Trim

Tim Hance with All Islands Home Inspections recently discovered completely deteriorated trim, with the real possibility of underlying structural damage, at a recent home inspection in Mount Vernon, WA. Keeping your exterior elements properly sealed (e.g., painted and caulked) will prevent deterioration. It’s all about protecting your home from the elements! When deterioration is discovered, it should be repaired and replaced as necessary, and then painted and caulked. The longer one waits, the more expensive the issue becomes.

Originally posted 2018-06-27 11:23:24.

Proper wiring for hot tubs

So, you’ve decided it’s time to finally get a hot tub!  It’s important to install wiring serving the hot tub properly for obvious safety reasons.  Pictured here is wiring simply run in the grass to the hot tub appliance. Hopefully it doesn’t get hit by a lawn mower or someone doesn’t trip over it!  Wiring should be sleeved in conduit, run underground to the hot tub and have a GFCI-protected subpanel installed within sight of the hot tub and readily accessible.  Also, any and all wiring modifications or additions at a home require a permit and inspection through the Department of Labor & Industries.  This was discovered at a recent home inspection in Mount Vernon.

Originally posted 2018-06-15 17:05:03.

THE AWARD FOR BEST SUPPORTING BRICK GOES TO…

I see lots of old houses with lots of handyman repairs when I’m on the job. While these repairs may not be up to code, I have to applaud ingenuity when I see it. 

For example, I recently noted handyman construction practices at an exterior deck stoop in Mount Vernon, where a brick was strategically placed to prop up a deck support column. Well-played, homeowner. Well-played…

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

UH OH: YOUR ELECTRICAL PANEL IS NAKED!

I think this goes without saying, but you really need to make sure your electrical panels have fully installed cover fronts. When I say fully installed, I mean that all the appropriate fasteners are in place and the front is secure. 

And when I say appropriate fasteners, I mean screws that are not sharp—which can potentially pierce underlying wiring. 

And when I say potentially…I’m just kidding. No more italics

So, what if you don’t have a panel cover front in the first place? This is a scenario I recently came across recently during an inspection in Mount Vernon. 

Obviously, if the circuits, circuit breakers, conductors, and other fun stuff are exposed to the world, you are inviting trouble to the party. 

And trouble is a terrible guest. 

The takeaway? Get your panel a cover, pronto!

Do you have questions or comments about electrical issues or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

INFOGRAPHIC: 4 SUGGESTIONS FOR MAINTAINING YOUR SIDING

Your siding needs tender, loving care. 

The good news: some of the most effective things homeowners can do to protect siding are relatively easy. For most folks, it just takes a little time and energy to ensure your investment stands the test of time.

If you have questions or comments about flooring issues or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

Water hammer issues?

Plumbing Equipment On House PlansWater hammer is a specific plumbing noise, not a generic name for pipe clatter. It occurs when you shut off fast-moving water suddenly, bringing it to a quick halt and creating a sort of shock wave and a hammering noise. Fix “water hammer” by draining the plumbing system. Open the uppermost faucet (or the one furthest from the water meter) and the lowest (or closest to the meter) and allow the water to flow to a lower-level sink or floor drain. Draining the system restores air to air chambers. Close the lowest faucet and refill the system. For more detailed information see this article.

Originally posted 2014-09-16 21:06:38.

SATURDAY REVIEW: ‘AMAZING REPORT WITH TIPS ON LONG-TERM HOME CARE’

A couple of Saturdays per month, I like to share recent customer reviews with you. I hope that these client testimonies—which come primarily from YelpFacebook, and Google Reviews—help you to feel more confident in my services while also saying “thanks” to clients who provide me with feedback.

This week, we hear from client Matt Jones.

My customers (you) allow me a chance to do a job I love in a place I’ve called home my whole life. Without you, All Islands Inspections wouldn’t exist. Thank you!

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

SATURDAY REVIEW: ‘(TIM) IS PATIENT & WILLING TO ANSWER ALL YOUR QUESTIONS’

Since I started All Islands Home Inspections in 2006, I’ve worked hard to become the best home inspector in Northwest Washington. To accomplish this goal, I’ve tried to meet and exceed client expectations during every inspection.  

In return, my business has developed an excellent reputation throughout Island, San Juan, Whatcom, and Skagit Counties. 

A couple of Saturdays per month, I like to share recent customer reviews with you. I hope that these client testimonies—which come primarily from YelpFacebook, and Google Reviews—help you to feel more confident in my services while also saying “thanks” to clients who provide me with feedback.

This week, we hear from client Cindy F.

In conclusion, my customers (you) allow me a chance to do a job I love in a place I’ve called home my whole life. Without you, All Islands Inspections wouldn’t exist. Thank you!

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

INFOGRAPHIC: WANT TO RUIN YOUR HARDWOOD FLOOR? DO THESE 3 THINGS

You know the saying: “Owning a hardwood floor doesn’t have to be hard.” 

Okay, I don’t think that’s actually a saying, but it really should be because that’s pretty clever (if I don’t say so myself). Bottom line: If you follow a few basic rules, your floor will last for many years and decades to come. 

If you have questions or comments about flooring issues or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

3 QUESTIONS: FLOORING WITH WOODCRAFT WOOD FLOORS

Every month, we seek to bring our readers insight from the worlds of home construction, home repair, and home maintenance straight from local Northwest Washington contractors in a segment we call “3 Questions.” Yep, you guessed it: we ask three questions, and the contractors answer them.

This month, we talk about flooring issues with WoodCraft Wood Floors, Inc. in Mount Vernon.

Q1: Oftentimes, home inspectors observe and report water-damaged or cupped wood flooring in kitchens, bathrooms, or adjacent exterior doors.  Can this be repaired and restored?

Floors that are water damaged can be replaced and refinished, or if the floor is not too far damaged by water, they can be dried and re-sanded. This must be determined by a hardwood flooring professional.

Q2:  In older homes, with original wood flooring, can the floors typically be refinished and restored?  Any advice or pointers for DIY weekend warriors thinking about restoring old wood floors?

Yes, old homes that have wood floors can be refinished. We typically don’t recommend DIY sanding floors because—if you do not know what you are doing—you can damage the floor and sand down too much of the surface, which can sand all the life left on the wear surface.

Q3: What’s your favorite type(s) of wood flooring, and why?

Red and white oak flooring is still a classic that does not go out of style.  It is a stable wood that is not susceptible to a lot of movement.

Bonus Q: Having floors refinished professionally vs. the DIY weekend warrior: what’s the typical cost difference one can expect?

Professional refinishing can run approximately $4.50 per square feet and up. DIY will cost rental, sanding materials (paper, wood filler, sealer, finish, applicators), time and labor.

About WoodCraft Wood Floors, Inc.
Woodcraft Wood Floors, Inc has been serving Skagit, Whatcom, Island, San Juan and part of Snohomish Counties since 1980. In the 1980s, the company operated under the name of Woodcraft Construction, and focused on design and building construction with a wood flooring division. Over the years, its wood floors became so popular that the business decided to close the design-build portion of its business and concentrate on only wood flooring. In 1991, it became Woodcraft Wood Floors, Inc. Woodcraft Wood Floors is also a member of the National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA), which sets the standards for the wood flooring industry. For more information, visit https://www.woodcraftwoodfloors.com.


A big “thanks” to Woodcraft Wood Floors for their responses.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).