Tag Archives: maintenance

COSTLY LOG DAMAGE REPAIRS

Is your log home showing signs of water intrusion to the interior, or are the logs showing signs of water staining (i.e., darkening)?  This is a definite potential problem and can lead to interior log core damage that isn’t visible without invasive inspection (i.e., log core drilling).  It may be time for a qualified log home contractor to take a look at whether or not there may be further log (core) damage.  Log damage and repairs can be costly, so it is best to be proactive with maintaining log elements throughout your home; the longer you wait, the worse the issue becomes.    

Home maintenance for October

October means it’s about to get cold and brings with it lots of homeowner tasks. Among other things, remember to:

  • Check the roof for loose, cracked or missing shingles.
  • Trim tree limbs away from the roof and windows.
  • Check weather stripping and caulking around doors and windows and repair or replace as necessary.
  • Store paints, caulks and liquid materials in warmer areas or remove from unheated areas and sheds.
  • Detach and store hoses.
  • Clean gutters after most of the leaves have fallen and make sure downspouts and gutter extensions are in good repair.
  • Set thermostats and automatic sprinklers for winter.
  • Reverse fan blades for winter settings.
  • Ensure that gauges on home fire extinguishers indicate a full charge. Replace if necessary.

Roof maintenance

If your roof isn’t too steeply pitched and has material that won’t be damaged by walking on it, AND you are mentally and physically fit to do so, carefully inspect it in good weather. Look for broken or missing shingles, missing or damaged flashing and seals around vent pipes and chimneys and damage to boards along the eaves. Shingle damage up-slope will often cause water damage far downhill. Check the chimney cap and screen and look down the flues for obstructions or animal nests. If you can’t or don’t want to get on the roof, you might want to use a ladder around the perimeter. Pay close attention to valleys and flashings; these are the primary leak-generators. Some simple, easy fixes now can prevent thousands of dollars of water damage later.

Home Maintenance Tips for Summer

Here’s some great information about Home Maintenance that can go a long way to ensuring a clean home inspection.

ManageMyLife.com has some suggestions for home maintenance:

  • Kitchen, bathroom: Check under your sinks for signs of leaks from supply pipes and waste pipes. Also check for rust on the bottom of enameled steel sinks and water damage to the countertop.
  • Structure and exterior: Check your home’s exterior wood for paint or wood stain needs.
  • Vinyl siding: Assess vinyl siding for cleaning needs. It requires less maintenance than most other sidings, but it still needs occasional cleaning.
  • Plumbing: Getting cold showers? The sediment in your water heater might be lowering your water temperature and the amount of available water. Flush sediment from your water heater.
  • Electrical: Inspect your outdoor electric wiring. While you’re outdoors during warm weather, take a few moments to inspect your outdoor electric outlets, lighting and wiring.
  • For more complete details and step-by-step guides see the article.

How to Turn the Gas OFF to Your Home!

This video explains how to turn off the gas at the gas meter from a recent home inspection in Anacortes on Fidalgo Island. It’s important to know where your shutoff valves are located, and how to turn them off in the event of an emergency.

All Islands Home Inspections services all of the San Juan Islands, including Orcas Island, San Juan Island, Friday Harbor, Shaw Island, Lopez Island and non-ferry served islands. We also service Anacortes and all of Skagit County, Whatcom County, Whidbey Island and all of Island County.

If you’re looking for a home inspector that’s so thorough and experienced you won’t end up buying the “Money Pit,” then you need Tim Hance of All Islands Home Inspections working for you. Tim Hance is a board certified Master Home Inspector who has personally conducted over 8,000 home inspections. Tim Hance is college educated (University of Washington, B.S. Chemistry, 1996), was a licensed contractor for a decade prior to becoming a home inspector and has extensive experience in real estate development.

 

 

How to Clean a Garbage Disposal

During the holidays we not only feed our family and friends more, but, typically, most of us feed our garbage disposal a lot more holiday food, too. Ehow.com says, “Anyone with a garbage disposal knows that some pretty funky odors can lurk down in the inner depths of its jaws. However, a garbage disposal may not seem like the easiest thing to clean, as liquids pour right through and powders just can’t get the greasy odors with a good scrub. If you would rather not stick your whole arm into your garbage disposal, but want to keep it clean, a few simple tricks will do the job.”

Summer Home Maintenance Tips

Here’s some great information about Home Maintenance that can go a long way to ensuring a clean home inspection.

ManageMyLife.com has some suggestions for home maintenance:

  • Kitchen, bathroom: Check under your sinks for signs of leaks from supply pipes and waste pipes. Also check for rust on the bottom of enameled steel sinks and water damage to the countertop.
  • Structure and exterior: Check your home’s exterior wood for paint or wood stain needs.
  • Vinyl siding: Assess vinyl siding for cleaning needs. It requires less maintenance than most other sidings, but it still needs occasional cleaning.
  • Plumbing: Getting cold showers? The sediment in your water heater might be lowering your water temperature and the amount of available water. Flush sediment from your water heater.
  • Electrical: Inspect your outdoor electric wiring. While you’re outdoors during warm weather, take a few moments to inspect your outdoor electric outlets, lighting and wiring.
  • For more complete details and step-by-step guides see the article.

Door, Hinge, & Lock Maintenance Tips

We know that performing routine maintenance now almost always saves trouble and/or expense later. But we are always busy doing something else and tend let things slip, especially things that work without much attention like door hinges and locks. Normally, they will be trouble free for years. As a routine preventive step or at the first sign of trouble, for locks, squirt a few drops of light household oil on a key and work it back and forth and side to side in the lock slot to clean and lubricate the parts. For doors, carefully oil the hinge joints and bolts .This will extend their service life by years. Wipe the oil off the key, lock and hinges when you are finished. While you are at it, be sure to tighten their mounting and set screws to keep them steady and aligned.

How to use your pressure washer

‘Tis the season for pressure washing!  Below is an article from our Friday Harbor, San Juan Islands Home Inspection eNewsletter addressing some great techniques and principles for pressure washing.  (With the below in mind, PLEASE don’t pressure wash your roofs!)

How to Use a Pressure Washer

eHow.com says, “Pressure washing can be a quick, easy way to clean your car, driveway, deck or siding. However, the powerful stream of water can also inflict damage if not handled properly. By learning a few techniques and principles, you’ll get the job done more quickly and won’t risk harming your home or family in the process.” However, pressure washers are not magic wands to be waved over a problem, they are power equipment, and, like all power equipment, it’s not as simple as it seems. For power washing basics see “How to Use a Pressure Washer.”

Plumbing Terms

Plumbing may be defined as the practice, materials and fixtures used in the installation, maintenance and alteration of all piping, fixtures, appliances and appurtenances in connection with sanitary and storm drainage facilities, the venting system, and public and private water supply systems. Plumbing does not include the trade of drilling water wells, installing water-softening equipment, or the business of manufacturing or selling plumbing fixtures, appliances, equipment or hardware. A plumbing system consists of three separate parts: an adequate potable water supply system; a safe, adequate drainage system; and ample fixtures and equipment. (read full article on InterNACHI)