Tag Archives: Langley

WAKING UP TO THE SOUND OF BIRDS!

Do you like waking up to the sound of birds in the morning?  Though this may be your preferred version of an alarm clock, I recommend screening openings in soffits on the exterior of your home to safeguard against bird and animal activity/intrusion.  If you see bird droppings running out of soffit vents, there’s a chance birds are getting into your attic and the soffit vent likely needs to be re-screened.  Don’t just cover it, as this can lead to elevated moisture in the attic.  

YOU COMPLETE ME: ELECTRICAL WORKS NEEDS TO BE FINISHED

Homeowners often get sidetracked when it comes to “to-do” lists, especially in older homes and homes that have not been well-maintained. There is always something to do!

When one task seems to be priority No. 1, another one creeps up and takes its place (sometimes after the first job has already started). Evidence of incomplete work is a common observation in my reports.

Case in point: on a recent job in Langley, I noted unfinished electrical wiring practices in the bathroom. I also called out handyman extension cord wiring practices at multiple outlets in my report. 

I recommended the completion of this unfinished electrical work in a timely fashion.

If you have questions or comments about electrical issues or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

I BROKE MY MOM’S BACK…(**MOM SCREAMS IN AGONY**)

It may be an old wives’ tale that stepping on a crack in a concrete walkway will without a doubt break your mother’s back.  Though the consequence of this action is likely far less grave, you could break your own back (it’s possible!). 

Settlement cracks in concrete walkways surrounding homes can be a tripping hazard for unwary passersby.  In 2021, we are taking lots of walks yet are more glued to our phones than ever.  I guess you could say we’re easily distracted…this isn’t all bad!  When it comes to walkways, though, this could present a safety issue.  Look at your phone at the wrong time…and of course the one time you look at it, you step in a crack!  You look over at your mom to make sure she’s okay, but to your amazement you are on the ground!  Taking phones out of the equation isn’t an option (**dismay**), so filling and repairing settlement cracks in your concrete driveway is the best option to protect carefree passersby.  Do your part to keep your neighbors safe and keep them coming around!

REAL ESTATE UNVEILED! PODCAST: FAQs PART II WITH TIM & LIZ HANCE

Listen to the latest podcast here!

In this fifth episode of the Real Estate Unveiled! podcast, Tim and Liz Hance are back for Round 2 of the FAQs that clients often want answers to regarding home inspections and real estate appraisals. This month, they discuss:

• What are home warranties, and should you have one?

• What do Tim and Liz think about online property valuation services?

• What kind of licensing requirements do real estate inspectors and appraisers have? 

• How much do inspections and appraisals typically cost? 

Check it out here: 

For more, subscribe to our newsletter at https://allislandsinspections.com/category/newsletters. If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

HISTORICAL ELECTRICAL EVENT REQUIRES FUTURE EVALUATION

It’s never fun to read (or write!) the phrase “evidence of a historical event” on a home inspection report. However, unless your home is brand-spanking new, these occurrences are just par for the course.

One common “historical event” I encounter are electrical events. During a recent inspection in Langley, I came across an outlet that appeared mildly charred. I can’t know how recently the sparks flew, so I recommended further evaluation by a qualified electrician.

If you have questions or comments about electrical issues or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

THE HEARTH IS WHERE THE HEART IS!

Do you have a non-combustible hearth extending 18 inches in front of your wood burning stove appliance?  This is recommended for safety reasons to protect the fireplace surroundings from possible combustion.  

Hearths are central/focal architectural elements of modernistic homes, dubbed by Frank Lloyd Wright.  Don’t fear, Frank is here!

In the United States, over 4,000 residential fires a year are caused by wood burning appliances.  Check out this link/.pdf for more information on wood burning stove awareness: Microsoft Word – Burn Wise fast facts_9.24.2014.docx (epa.gov)

STANDALONE SATURDAYS: LAZY WAVES + REMOTE SHORE = PRETTY PICTURE

On Saturdays throughout the year, I hope to give you a peek of what I see as a home inspector traveling around San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit counties through photos and videos I’ve taken along the way.

I’m sure if you know or live in Northwest Washington, you probably feel the same about how special it is here. That’s why I invite you to share your Northwest Washington imagery! Simply take your picture or video showing why you appreciate the region, and tag it with #AllIslandsLife on Twitter or Facebook.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

LIVING ON THE EDGE: DRIP-EDGE FLASHING DETAILS PLAY A BIG PART IN PROTECTING ROOFS

In my reports, I address flashing details (or the lack, thereof) quite often. Considering we live in a very wet environment, this makes perfect sense.

Today, I’d like to discuss metal drip-edge flashing details briefly. A drip-edge flashing detail is a material applied on a roof’s edge that gives the roof system more capacity to direct water away from the system.

Why is drip-edge flashing important? Well, lots of reasons, including:

• Insects and small pests are better deterred from infesting a roof system

• Water is better directed into building gutter systems and away from exteriors and foundations

• Shingles are better shielded from water damage

• Underlying rooflines are better protected from rot

I recently came across a home in Langley that was lacking drip-edge flashing. As a result, some of the roof system’s OSB sheathing was swelled and deteriorated. I advised them to address this as soon as possible.

If you have questions or comments about roofing systems or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

INFOGRAPHIC: SAFETY FIRST FOR WATER HEATERS

Most people don’t think about their water heaters until the hot water doesn’t flow. Cold showers have a way of getting a person’s attention, don’t they?

Don’t be one of those people.

In addition to regular maintenance, it is essential to observe certain safety practices when it comes to these workhorse appliances. We’ve listed a few tips in the infographic for you to consider. We hope they help!

Do you have questions or comments about water heaters? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).