Tag Archives: corrosion

VIDEO: Deteriorating Metal Roof Coverings!

At a recent home inspection in Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, I discovered a substantial amount of corrosion presenting at standing seam metal roof coverings. Of course, rust and corrosion will only worsen over time with exposure to the elements, so I advised further evaluation by a qualified roofing contractor to make necessary repairs. Fortunately, there was no evidence (yet) of water intrusion to the interior at the time of inspection, but this is another great reason that it’s important to annually inspect and maintain your roof, even a metal roof.

Originally posted 2018-04-23 14:34:26.

VIDEO: Deteriorated post brackets

Deteriorated and corroding post-to-base metal hardware brackets at deck systems should be replaced for safety reasons as they no longer serve their intended purpose. This was discovered at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands. When metal brackets begin to rust and corrode, painting with an exterior metal paint will help prolong serviceable life. Once they’re deteriorated, however, they’re clearly compromised and require replacement.

Originally posted 2017-12-22 12:00:34.

ENCAPSULATION CONSTERNATION: INSULATION CONCEALS CRAWL SPACE PIPE CORROSION

So, you’ve done the right thing in your crawl space and insulated water supply pipes. All is good, right?

Not so fast. 

During a recent visit to a home on Lopez Island, I came across this unfortunate issue: copper water pipes showing substantial corrosion—such as calcification deposits—despite the fact they were tucked into insulation. 

However, insulation is useless and even harmful when it displays signs of moisture intrusion. In this case, that’s the precise scenario I encountered.

The prognosis wasn’t good because the majority of the water supply piping was concealed behind pipe insulation. Therefore, much to my dismay, I had to recommend that all the water supply piping underneath the home be further evaluated by a qualified plumbing contractor to make repairs as deemed necessary. The only way to do that is to remove the insulation and take a look.

To learn more about protecting your pipes, Home Depot recently created a “how-to” video on the topic. Hope it helps you!

Questions or comments about plumbing or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

IN RAINY NW WASHINGTON, CHIMNEY FLASHING DETAILS SOMETIMES NEED TLC

The following is not exactly a news flash: Rust is a common issue here in the Pacific Northwest. I know, shocking, right? Living in a coastal environment has a way of helping rust to blossom (although, as you undoubtedly know, some areas in our little corner of the world get far less rain than others).

The highest-exposure sections of a home typically lead the charge when it comes to rust, and this includes chimney flashing and counter-flashing details. Taking care of these features is very importantbecause the flashing is what seals the space between your roof and your chimney. Rust and corrosion at these areas may allow water to enter the home and be pretty darn expensive to repair or replace.

Recently, during a home inspection in Oak Harbor, I noticed this issue. I recommended that the client use an exterior-rated metal paint to extend serviceable life of the chimney flashing details that were beginning to rust and corrode. These types of preventative measures can potentially save a good bit of coin later.

Do you have questions or comments about flashing details or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

BOILING OVER: HEATING SYSTEM NEEDS FULL SERVICE BEFORE CLOSING

Homeowners often like to use their appliances well after their statistical life expectancies. While using something that is in perfectly good working order—while perhaps a little on the “old” side—isn’t always a bad thing, I will always recommend that clients budget for appliance replacement based on these average lifespan figures. Obviously, there are many factors that impact how long an appliance will last, such as maintenance (or deferred maintenance). 

During a recent inspection in Freeland, I came across an oil-fired radiant circulating boiler heating appliance in likely need of replacement. I noted the boiler was approaching the end of its statistical expected life of 20-25 years, and that rust and corrosion were noted at many of the appliance fittings.

While the last apparent service for this appliance was recently undertaken, I couldn’t verify as to whether or not this appliance was FULLY serviced (including all related heating system infrastructure). To that end, I highly recommended full service of the boiler, water heater, and all related infrastructure by a qualified HVAC contractor prior to closing.

If you have questions or comments about heating systems or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

IN RAINY NW WASHINGTON, CHIMNEY FLASHING DETAILS SOMETIMES NEED TLC

https://youtu.be/H4aNiQW7_ec

The following is not exactly a news flash: Rust is a common issue here in the Pacific Northwest. I know, shocking, right? Living in a coastal environment has a way of helping rust to blossom (although, as you undoubtedly know, some areas in our little corner of the world get far less rain than others).

The highest-exposure sections of a home typically lead the charge when it comes to rust, and this includes chimney flashing and counter-flashing details. Taking care of these features is very importantbecause the flashing is what seals the space between your roof and your chimney. Rust and corrosion at these areas may allow water to enter the home and be pretty darn expensive to repair or replace.

Recently, during a home inspection in Oak Harbor, I noticed this issue. I recommended that the client use an exterior-rated metal paint to extend serviceable life of the chimney flashing details that were beginning to rust and corrode. These types of preventative measures can potentially save a good bit of coin later.

Do you have questions or comments about flashing details or home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).