Category Archives: Roofing

LIVING ON THE EDGE: DRIP-EDGE FLASHING DETAILS PLAY A BIG PART IN PROTECTING ROOFS

In my reports, I address flashing details (or the lack, thereof) quite often. Considering we live in a very wet environment, this makes perfect sense.

Today, I’d like to discuss metal drip-edge flashing details briefly. A drip-edge flashing detail is a material applied on a roof’s edge that gives the roof system more capacity to direct water away from the system.

Why is drip-edge flashing important? Well, lots of reasons, including:

• Insects and small pests are better deterred from infesting a roof system

• Water is better directed into building gutter systems and away from exteriors and foundations

• Shingles are better shielded from water damage

• Underlying rooflines are better protected from rot

I recently came across a home in Langley that was lacking drip-edge flashing. As a result, some of the roof system’s OSB sheathing was swelled and deteriorated. I advised them to address this as soon as possible.

If you have questions or comments about roofing systems or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

REPTILE ROOF? FLAT ROOF COVERINGS CAN SHOW SIGNS OF ‘ALLIGATORING’

If your membrane roofing system is aging, your roof coverings may experience severe cracking—which may resemble the skin of a reptile. 

This condition, known in the home inspection industry as “alligatoring,” is a common occurrence. It happens because of sun damage, ice, and temperature variations—and cracks can get worse if left untreated.

I recently came across built-up flat roof coverings that were alligatoring at a house in Bow, and I recommended the homeowner budget for re-seal coating the roofing. This is a three-step process that involves ridding the surfaces of dust and particles, applying a primer and then finally a coating. 

Because this issue is common with membrane roofing systems, homeowners with these systems should inspect their roofs at least twice per year. Apply new coatings as needed, and make sure to repair any blisters that could cause leakage.

If you have questions or comments about roofing repairs or home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

3 QUESTIONS: ROOFING SYSTEMS WITH CASCADE ROOFING COMPANY INC.

Every month, we seek to bring our readers insight from the worlds of home construction, home repair, and home maintenance straight from local Northwest Washington contractors in a segment we call “3 Questions.” Yep, you guessed it: we ask three questions, and the contractors answer them.

This month, we talk about roofing systems with Richard Steiner, president at Cascade Roofing Company Inc. in Burlington.

Q1: Do you have any advice, or pet peeves, to share with our audience about roofs? 

Please do research on your contractor, such as: 

• Are they licensed, bonded, and insured?

• How many years have they been in business?

• Are they recommended by the Better Business Bureau?

Q2: Do you perform roof repairs on an older roof installed by another contractor or is this too high of liability?

We do all types of repairs, old and new.  If another company may have installed the roof, check with them first to see if you still have a warranty.  If a warranty is still in place and we were to do the repair it could void your current warranty.

Q3: What’s your preferred method of roof ventilation and why? Soffit / gable vents, soffit / roof vents or soffit / ridge vents?

For roof ventilation, continuous ridge vent or can vents are our preferred method. We also use soffit vents, which are considered a positive air flow system whereas gable vents are deemed inadequate.

Bonus Q: What advice can you give homeowners about how to best maintain their roof system?

Roof maintenance is best done by a professional.  But if it’s not in the budget, we recommend moss treatment and keeping gutters and drains free from any debris.  Note:  Have a contractor install some tie off anchors before doing your own maintenance so that you can be safe on the roof.

About Cascade Roofing Company Inc.

Cascade Roofing Company Inc. provides commercial and residential roofing services throughout the Skagit Valley and Whidbey Island regions. With more than 30 years of experience, the company guarantees quality workmanship at affordable rates. The organization is also a proud member of The Skagit/Island Counties Builders Association (SICBA) and is accredited with the Better Business Bureau.

For more information, visit www.cascaderoofingcompanyinc.com .
 
A big “thanks” to Richard for his responses!

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

VIDEO: MAINTENANCE PRACTICES THAT CAN SAVE YOUR ROOF

Your roof. 

How’s it going up there? Have you taken a trip to the top of your house recently to say “hello?” Have you even looked at it lately? 

If you haven’t checked in with your home’s roof coverings, you may want to sometime soon because here in the Pacific Northwest, weather can get wet and wild—and moisture can cause havoc with roofing systems if the systems are not adequately maintained. 

Today, I’m going to share some tips on how to care for asphalt composition roof systems. 

Below are some key points I’ll elaborate on in the video below. I hope you enjoy it!

• Treat your roof 2x annually

• Use zinc granules and powders

• Spray treatment can work

• Don’t pressure wash!

If you have questions or comments about roofing, tweet me (@AIHomeInspect).

REPLACING ROOF COVERINGS ON A MANUFACTURED HOME? THEN PLEASE KNOW THIS

Manufactured homes play by different rules when it comes to roof coverings.

With manufactured homes, homeowners must obtain a permit through the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries when roof coverings are replaced. It is also imperative not to install more than one (1) layer of roof coverings on a manufactured home without the expressed consent of the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries and an engineer.

I recently came upon a manufactured home on Fidalgo Island with significant roofing issues. In particular, the home’s 3-Tab roof coverings were deteriorated and well beyond their serviceable life. I noted in my report the possibility of underlying damage not visible without an invasive inspection and recommended budgeting for select repair and replacement of deteriorated sheathing once the roof coverings were stripped. 

Do you have questions or comments about roofing? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

PRESSURE WASHING YOUR ROOF: JUST A REALLY BAD IDEA

Roof coverings need love. For roof coverings, love means maintenance, such as clearing roof planes of debris or treating roofs on a semi-annual basis to prevent moss growth.

Love does not mean pressure washing a roof, however. Don’t believe me? Roofing experts will tell you the same thing.

Pressure washing can cut the life expectancy of a roof dramatically, and lead to mechanical damage—such as granular loss and exposed fiberglass underlayment at roof shingles. Exposed shingles with granular loss are vulnerable to reduced life expectancy. I discovered this very scenario during a recent inspection in Coupeville.

Do you have questions or comments about roofing? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

DOES YOUR WOOD STOVE NEED A CREOSOTE ANTIDOTE?

If you’re Dick Van Dyke as Bert in Mary Poppins, you might view this as job security. For the rest of us, it’s a hassle that needs to be cleaned up.

To what am I referring? 

A whole lot of creosote and tar glaze I noted at a wood stove flue pipe during a recent home inspection in Sedro-Woolley. I also pointed out the lack of a rain cap over the open flue pipe. As a result of my review, I recommended further evaluation and cleaning of the wood burning stove and flue by a qualified chimney sweep. 

“Chim chiminey, chim chiminey, chim chim cher-ee…”

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).