Author Archives: AIHI

GIVE YOUR VEGETATIVE OVERGROWTH A MUCH-NEEDED HAIRCUT

Electricity and flammable objects don’t play well together—unless you define “playing well together” as starting a house fire.

If you take the traditional view on what “playing well together” means, however, I would suggest you pay attention to vegetative overgrowth in direct contact with overhead electrical service entrance conductors. Allowing this type of contact is a bad idea. 

I came across this issue recently on a home inspection in Bellingham, and I noted in my report to provide proper clearance for safety reasons.

Do you have questions or comments about electrical issues? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

THANK YOU, MOISTURE METER!

Moisture meters are awesome! They detect underlying saturation not visible to the eye which, caught early enough, is easily fixed and avoids water and insect damage. I use my moisture meter at every inspection, and I consider it one of the best tools in my arsenal.

Recently—during an inspection of a house in Bow—I used my moisture meter on a bathroom linoleum floor. During my testing, I noted saturation between the toilet and shower when I probed it with a moisture meter, suggesting a likely plumbing leak from the toilet (and possibly the shower). As a result, I recommend further evaluation and repair by a contractor.

Do you have questions or comments about moisture issues in your home? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

STANDALONE SATURDAYS: DOCK LIGHTS

On Saturdays throughout the year, I hope to give you a peek of what I see as a home inspector traveling around San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit counties through photos and videos I’ve taken along the way.

I’m sure if you know or live in Northwest Washington, you probably feel the same about how special it is here. That’s why I invite you to share your Northwest Washington imagery! Simply take your picture or video showing why you appreciate the region, and tag it with #AllIslandsLife on Twitteror Facebook.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

Fun Facts Friday

Calling “shotgun” when riding in a car comes from the term “shotgun messenger” which was used to refer to the guard who sat next to the Stagecoach driver. The guards would use a shotgun to keep robbers and criminals away. It made its way into society due to Hollywood’s love of Western flicks.

The only letters that don’t appear on the periodic table are J & Q.

Canadians say “sorry” so much that a law was passed in 2009 declaring that an apology can’t be used as evidence of admission to guilt.

ACTIVE LEAK AND CORROSION AT GALVANIZED PIPE FITTING: IT’S JUST A MATTER OF TIME UNTIL THIS GETS MUCH WORSE

If you don’t take care of leaks when they first occur, a funny thing begins to happen: they get worse. Recently, during an inspection in Langley, I discovered an active plumbing leak in the crawl space at the main water shutoff valve. 

I also noted corrosion at the galvanized pipe fitting. I stated in the report that my clients should consult a qualified plumbing contractor to take care of this before the problem worsened.

Do you have questions or comments about plumbing issues? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

ANOTHER ADVENTURE WITH LP INNERSEAL COMPOSITE SIDING

I’ve written about LP InnerSeal composite siding a bit here on the blog because I encounter it relatively often. As you might know, LP InnerSeal siding is a product that was subject to a class-action lawsuitfor premature failure and elevated maintenance requirements. 

Despite these issues, the siding will potentially deliver years of serviceable life if well and proactively maintained (e.g., painted and caulked). However, it does require high maintenance. 

I recently came across a home in Freeland that had deteriorated and swelled LP composite siding, together with fungal growth. In my report, I recommended that my clients have the siding further evaluated by a qualified contractor, one familiar with LP InnerSeal siding and its unique painting requirements.

Do you have questions or comments about siding issues? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

STANDALONE SATURDAYS: FORREST CLEARING

On Saturdays throughout the year, I hope to give you a peek of what I see as a home inspector traveling around San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit counties through photos and videos I’ve taken along the way.

I’m sure if you know or live in Northwest Washington, you probably feel the same about how special it is here. That’s why I invite you to share your Northwest Washington imagery! Simply take your picture or video showing why you appreciate the region, and tag it with #AllIslandsLife on Twitteror Facebook.

If you have questions or comments about home inspections in general, tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

INFOGRAPHIC: TOP SIGNS OF BUG INFESTATION

How do you know if you have an insect activity problem on your hand? Well, these little critters leave lots of clues. You only need to consider a few basic things. Thanks for reading!

Do you have questions or comments about home inspections in general? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

DON’T LIKE INSECTS? THEN LOSE THE MOISTURE!

Wood-destroying insects are attracted to moisture and seek it out, so it’s imperative to keep your home dry. This moisture may come from issues such as plumbing leaks, water intrusion, and improper ventilation.

Good news, though: If your home is dry, these wood destroying insects will not have any interest in your home’s wood elements. So, keep on top of the moisture, and you stay on top of the problem.

I recently came across active water and insect activity/damage while inspecting a laundry room facility in a house on Whidbey Island. In my report, I noted insect frass, delaminated floor coverings, and saturation when probed with a moisture meter. I also noted the possibility of underlying damage not visible without invasive inspection.

Do you have questions or comments about insect activity in your home? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).

REPLACING ROOF COVERINGS ON A MANUFACTURED HOME? THEN PLEASE KNOW THIS

Manufactured homes play by different rules when it comes to roof coverings.

With manufactured homes, homeowners must obtain a permit through the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries when roof coverings are replaced. It is also imperative not to install more than one (1) layer of roof coverings on a manufactured home without the expressed consent of the Washington State Department of Labor & Industries and an engineer.

I recently came upon a manufactured home on Fidalgo Island with significant roofing issues. In particular, the home’s 3-Tab roof coverings were deteriorated and well beyond their serviceable life. I noted in my report the possibility of underlying damage not visible without an invasive inspection and recommended budgeting for select repair and replacement of deteriorated sheathing once the roof coverings were stripped. 

Do you have questions or comments about roofing? Go “All” in and tweet us (@AIHomeInspect).