Tag Archives: orcas island

VIDEO: Saturation under and around toilet

At a recent home inspection on Orcas Island, I discovered water stains around a toilet that the Seller informed us were “historic.” Probing with a moisture meter, it was clear that the subfloor was clearly saturated with the possibility of underlying damage not visible without pulling the toilet and invasively inspecting. Moisture meters and infrared thermography help home inspectors determine elevated moisture conditions not visible to the naked eye.

VIDEO: Deteriorated post brackets

Deteriorated and corroding post-to-base metal hardware brackets at deck systems should be replaced for safety reasons as they no longer serve their intended purpose. This was discovered at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands. When metal brackets begin to rust and corrode, painting with an exterior metal paint will help prolong serviceable life. Once they’re deteriorated, however, they’re clearly compromised and require replacement.

VIDEO: Dangling exterior outlets

Dangling, loose exterior outlets were discovered at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands. When new siding is installed on a home, sometimes over existing (original) siding, it’s important to properly re-secure exterior outlets and fixtures to the (thicker) new siding and perimeter envelope. Securing loose electrical fixtures and appliances is important for safety reasons because (1) it’s important to keep rain out of electrical connections and (2) as wires move back and forth with use, because they’re not secured, they can become mechanically damaged and wiring connections can be compromised.

Roof leak and water damage

When you see water stains on the ceiling, together with plastic Tupperware, you know there’s likely an active roof leak!  Of course, I use very expensive equipment to confirm (e.g., moisture meter and infrared thermography camera), but this one was obvious.  With water intrusion, there’s always the possibility of underlying damage not visible without invasive inspection; it wouldn’t hurt to open the ceiling and look for possible mold growth.  This was discovered at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands.

Signs of water intrusion

So, you see a black spot on your sheetrock ceiling, what to do?  Well, you may very well have a water intrusion issue.  Pictured here is apparent mold growth on a sheetrock ceiling which, when probed with my moisture meter, revealed underlying saturation within the ceiling cavity above.  The likely contributing factor was a roof leak for which I recommended further evaluation, remediation and repair by a qualified contractor.  There is the possibility of underlying damage and mold growth not visible until the sheetrock is removed.  This was discovered at an Orcas Island home inspection in the San Juan Islands.

Video: Water Intrusion and Damaged OSB Sheathing in Crawl Space!

Water intrusion and damage were noted at OSB structural wall sheathing in the crawl space at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands. I like to say “Water is the enemy” to my clients, because much of what I report as a home inspector in the Pacific Northwest has to do with water damage. Water can lead to structural damage, settling, mold, and insect activity/damage (e.g., carpenter ants, anobiid beetles, termites, moisture ants, rot fungus, etc.). So, if you see water intrusion, deal with it sooner than later because repairs become much more expensive with time.

Video: DAMAGED Cement-Fiber Lap Siding Boards!

Damaged cement-fiber lap siding boards were discovered at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands. A qualified contractor would recommend repair and replacement of damaged siding boards, which can be surprisingly expensive. It’s always important to get bids for repair prior to closing as costs may be surprising and it’s important to fully understand the home’s issues, and costs to remedy, prior to closing so you’re fully informed.

Video: Deteriorated LP InnerSeal Siding

Deteriorated LP InnerSeal composite siding was discovered at a recent home inspection on Orcas Island in the San Juan Islands. This siding product was subject to class-action lawsuit for premature failure and elevated maintenance requirements. Well maintained, e.g., painted and caulked pursuant to LP’s recommendations, this product will deliver years of serviceable life. But, if it’s not well maintained it will deteriorate quickly and can lead to underlying structural damage. In this case, I recommended further evaluation by a qualified contractor, one familiar with LP InnerSeal composite siding, to further evaluate and make necessary repairs.

VIDEO: Blocked Vent Pipe Atop Roof at Orcas Island Home Inspection

If you note that some, or any, of your black ABS vent pipes on the roof are capped, there’s a good chance that the contractor forgot to remove the caps after construction. These caps are designed to pressure test the vent and drainage system to make sure they don’t leak as a condition of the building inspection. After the test, the contractor is supposed to remove these caps but this step is sometimes missed. So, if you see caps atop your roof, take them off unless the pipe itself has been abandoned (e.g., from a remodel).