Author Archives: Tim Hance

DANGEROUS Settled Deck Support Posts Discovered!

Tim Hance with All Islands Home Inspections recently discovered dangerous, settled support posts, subsequently unprofessionally repaired, at a home inspection in the San Juan Islands. This issue was referred to a qualified contractor for further evaluation and repair prior to closing for obvious safety reasons. Thanks for watching!

Restricted Roof Soffit Vents Lead to Roof Moisture Problems!

Tim Hance if All Islands Home Inspections videos restricted soffit vents at a recent home inspection. It’s important that soffit vents remain free and clear of obstructions to prevent elevated moisture conditions within ceiling cavities that can lead to structural damage and mold growth within. Thanks for watching!

Airplane hangar door inspection

Tim Hance of All Islands Home Inspections shares a neat hangar door operation video from a recent home and hangar inspection. All Islands Home Inspections services all of Anacortes, the San Juan Islands, Skagit, Whatcom, Island, San Juan, and Snohomish counties. If you’re looking for a home inspector that’s so thorough and experienced that you won’t get stuck buying the “Money Pit,” then you need All Islands Home Inspections working for you! We’ve inspected over 8,000 homes to date and feel we are simply the best in the industry. We look forward to working with you soon, THANKS!

Fun Fact Friday!

7.5 million toothpicks can be created from a cord of wood.

The Baby Ruth candy bar was actually named after Grover Cleveland’s baby daughter, Ruth.

Dueling is legal in Paraguay as long as both parties are registered blood donors.

The word “nerd” was first coined by Dr. Seuss in “If I Ran the Zoo.”

Awesome idea: Concealed trash cans

Inspecting a home in Friday Harbor on beautiful San Juan Island, I initially thought these covers were for water shutoff valves. Looking closer, they’re actually buried garbage cans! Really cool concept, keeps garbage out of sight and mind, easily accessible. You probably have to replace the cans from time to time as they deteriorate and the garbage collector may take issue, but this was unique to me so I thought I’d share!

Safety: Anti-tip brackets for ranges

Anti-tip brackets are metal devices designed to prevent freestanding ranges from tipping. They are normally attached to one of the rear legs of the range or screwed into the wall behind the range, and are included in all installation kits. A unit that is not equipped with these devices may tip over if enough weight is applied to its open door, such as that from a large Thanksgiving turkey, or even a small child. A falling range can crush, scald, or burn anyone caught beneath.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were 143 incidents caused by range tip-overs from 1980 to 2006. Of the 33 incidents that resulted in death, most of those victims were children. A small child may stand on an open range door in order to see what is cooking on the stovetop and accidentally cause the entire unit to fall on top of him, along with whatever hot items may have been cooking on the stovetop. The elderly, too, may be injured while using the range for support while cleaning.

In response to this danger, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) created standards in 1991 that require all ranges manufactured after that year to be capable of remaining stable while supporting 250 pounds of weight on their open doors. Manufacturers’ instructions, too, require that anti-tip brackets provided be installed.

Check Your Range

It may be possible to see a wall-mounted bracket by looking over the rear of the range. Floor-mounted brackets are often hidden, although in some models with removable drawers, such as 30-inch electric ranges made by General Electric, the drawers can be removed and a flashlight can be used to search for the bracket.

A more certain test is trying to carefully tip the range. The range should be turned off, and all items should be removed from the stovetop first. Then, firmly grip the upper-rear section of the range and tip the unit. If it’s equipped with an anti-tip bracket, the unit will not tip more than several inches before coming to a halt. It is usually easier to detect a bracket by tipping the range than through a visual search. This test can be performed on all models and it can confirm the functionality of a bracket.

If you can play “peek-a-boo” through your fire separation barrier, you’ve got work to do

Fire separation barrier walls can help slow the spread of fire—if properly constructed and maintained. In today’s post, Tim Hance of All Islands Home Inspections identifies issues he recently discovered at a residential building in Oak Harbor in which a fire separation wall separating two units had fairly significant open seams in the attic. These seams should be taped and mudded. **Bonus points for readers today: What’s the difference between fire separation barrier and a firewall? Learn more here! Thanks for watching…